Teacher view: Gareth Davies

Gareth Davies English teacher and lead teacher for gifted and talented students, Sawtry Community College gareth.davies@sawtrycc.org.uk; @SawtryEnglish
Gareth Davies
English teacher and lead teacher for gifted and talented students, Sawtry Community College
gareth.davies@sawtrycc.org.uk; @SawtryEnglish

I’ve been teaching English for nearly twenty years, I’ve led two English departments and I’ve seen every development, diktat and dead-end in education from the passing of the Banda duplicator to the arrival of the interactive whiteboard. Although everything has changed about the classroom, nothing has changed in it.

Teacher view: Eugene Dapper

 

Head of Year in a London secondary school EugeneDapper@yahoo.co.uk
Eugene Dapper
Head of Year in a London secondary school
EugeneDapper@yahoo.co.uk

A vision for teaching, but whose vision is it?

We have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to shape the travel and direction in which the teaching profession is heading. I am worried that, unless we take control of this opportunity, the teaching profession will be a rudderless ship. Teaching again will be a ship at sea battling turbulent seas and gale-force winds, being blown off-course and arriving at a destination not of its making nor its desire. This has been the experience of the teaching profession for almost two decades and it’s important that this opportunity is not squandered; that we take control of its destiny.

Teacher view: Gareth Alcott

Gareth Alcott Assistant head teacher at King Alfred's Academy, Wantage galcott@kaacademy.org; @GalcottGareth
Gareth Alcott
Assistant head teacher at King Alfred’s Academy, Wantage
galcott@kaacademy.org; @GalcottGareth

“For research to work effectively for busy teachers, a new College must ensure a number of things…”

Since the Department for Education’s announcement of a consultation on 9th December, support for the College of Teaching has gained momentum. More and more teachers are backing the Claim Your College campaign. During the process of going public, questions and concerns have been raised on social media, in staffrooms, and in the press. No one person can answer all these queries – and nor should they. Yet collectively, we – the teachers in the classrooms – must have opinions on these issues and contribute to their answers if we are to claim our professional autonomy. Having a College of Teaching will allow us to build our professional capital and raise the professional status of teachers.